Till startsida
Webbkarta
Till innehåll Läs mer om hur kakor används på gu.se

Christine Wennerås research group

  

Contact Information | List of Publications

Home Page

 

1) Infections, inflammation and immune defense in immunocompromised patients


2) Eosinophils – the Treg of innate immunity

 

1) Infections, inflammation and immune defense in immunocompromised patients

Patients with hematological malignancies and rheumatic systemic diseases often succumb to infections due to their depressed immune state, which results from the underlying disease in combination with chemotherapy and other immune suppressive therapy. It can be challenging to discriminate systemic inflammation caused by an infectious agent from systemic inflammation arising from the disease and/or chemotherapy. Immunocompromised patients contract infections caused by opportunistic microbes that do not give rise to disease in healthy individuals and can be difficult to diagnose. It is important to protect these patients from infections by vaccination but they frequently respond poorly to vaccines.

Relevant projects

  • Discrimination of infectious from non-infectious systemic inflammation via modeling using multivariate methods of pattern recognition
  • Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis – new tick-borne infectious agent that mainly targets immune compromised hosts
  • Pneumococcal immunity and vaccine efficacy in patients with multiple myeloma
  • Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in hematology patients and lung transplant recipients

     

 2) Eosinophils – the Treg of innate immunity

The eosinophilic granulocyte in mainly associated with parasite/helminth infections and allergic reactions. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an emerging disease characterized by an eosinophil-dense infiltrate of the esophageal mucosa. It is believed to be a T cell-driven chronic remitting inflammation; the identity of the causative antigen is unknown but allergens have been implicated. Graft-versus-host disease is another T cell-driven inflammatory condition that afflicts about half of allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. Eosinophilia is associated with more lenient forms of graft-versus-host disease. Our hypothesis is that eosinophils are “good cells” that down-modulate exaggerated T cell activity. They contain large amounts of galectin-10, a protein shown to endow Treg with suppressive capacity. Our focus is on studies of the immunosuppressive role of eosinophils in eosinophilic esophagitis and in graft-versus-host disease, and on uncovering the eosinophil’s immune suppressive mechanisms.

 

Further information:

Home Page

 

 

Group members

Christine Wennerås MD PhD, group leader, Professor (adjunct University of Gothenburg) and senior physician in clinical bacteriology and hematology (Sahlgrenska University Hospital).
Madeleine Ingelsten PhD, Postdoc
Jennie Andersson PhD, Postdoc
Kerstin Andersson Technician
Johanna Karlsson MD, PhD student
Christine Lingblom MSc, PhD student
Julia Cromvik MD, PhD student
Anna Grankvist MSc, PhD student
 

Sidansvarig: Dan Baeckström|Sidan uppdaterades: 2016-09-19
Dela:

På Göteborgs universitet använder vi kakor (cookies) för att webbplatsen ska fungera på ett bra sätt för dig. Genom att surfa vidare godkänner du att vi använder kakor.  Vad är kakor?